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Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Lead Health Issues Remain Major Concern

UPDATE: May 2010 - Heavy Metals Poisoning Part 1

While lead levels in face paint and toys remain a focus, more impetus needs to be placed on the impact of lead and other heavy metals and how they impact people the health of those living in N. Idaho's Silver Valley where EPA is moving ahead with its toxic waste dump adjacent to the National Historic site and Sacred Native lands at the Cataldo Mission.
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 28 (UPI) -- Before children apply face paint for Halloween, parents should know that some face paints contain lead and other heavy metals, a U.S. advocacy group says.

Lisa Archer, national coordinator of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics at the Breast Cancer Fund, says the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics sent 10 children's face paints to an independent lab to test for heavy metals and review ingredient labels of Halloween products sold at a seasonal holiday store.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that parents avoid using cosmetics on their children that could be contaminated with lead, Archer says.

The report, "Pretty Scary," found:
-- Ten out of 10 children's face paints contained lead ranging from 0.05 to 0.65 parts per million.

-- Six out of 10 children's face paints contained nickel, cobalt and/or chromium, which are top allergens in children. The metals were found at levels ranging from 1.6 to 120 ppm -- many of them far exceeding industry safety recommendations of 1 ppm.

To learn more about the study see:
To learn more about the issues surrounding the nation's largest lead Superfund site read more here -

Silver Valley Action

Silver Valley Action Photo Album


Heavy Metal

Even if you do not live in the 1500 square mile area of this Superfund site you can help by supporting the work and signing the petition.

In a related article, Why your doctor should know where you have lived, environmental exposure is listed as a health risk.  This question was always included in the process of taking a complete health history when I worked as a nurse practitioner.  It is part of what I taught my students when I was teaching at the college level.  Why it has been lost in the process over the years is a mystery I am sure, but it is important.  It still is just one part of what a complete health history should include; what you are exposed to in your work is as important, and also what you use at home and in your garden.  Reason why you should have a running copy of your own medical record in your possession, just as people do in other countries.

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