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Saturday, December 15, 2012

What You Don't Know About Energy Drinks

Energy drinks are at it again, and in the news.  The 5 Hour Energy CEO has played the "I don't know" game along with "I'll have to get back to you with that information" and more prattle while avoiding the real issues. While 5 Hour Energy is not the only member of this product category, one thing for sure is that it does contain sucralose. And if you don't know about sucralose (marketed as Splenda) by now you can go here for more information. Another of my trusted sources, that today re-issued one of their older articles, has this to say:
Energy drinks are labeled wrong. They don’t energize you – they stimulate you. Research shows that beyond a brief caffeine high, there are actually no health benefits to energy drinks. In fact, the combination of different chemicals is likely to do more harm than good, especially for children. People need to stop over-reaching for that buzz that will not carry through the day. Drinking 3, 4 or even 5 Five Hour Energy shots in one sitting will not help you stay energized throughout the day. The circumstances suggest that, for some, it could be deadly.

Here's why: 5 Hour Energy Shots contain synthesized versions of Citicoline, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine, Taurine, Malic Acid, Glucuronolactone, and phenylalanine.

Besides the same amount of caffeine as 12 ounces of the leading cup of premium coffee, 5 Hour Energy does not contain carbohydrates, yet they claim it provides energy. 5 Hour Energy contains 2000% daily value of B6 and the 8333% of B12. All other ingredients including amino acids are in amounts considered to be healthy, but what about the amount of B Vitamins? The company states that the B Vitamins in their supplement; B6, B12, B3, and B9 are water soluble, any amount that is not absorbed is “expelled with no toxic effects.”  

What they fail to explain is that water, an essential ingredient that is needed to expel unused B Vitamins, should be mega-dosed to offset the mega-dose of B Vitamins in a 5 Hour Energy shot. Contrary to belief, it is possible to overdose on Vitamin B. Overdosing on Vitamin B happens when intolerable amounts are taken over a long period of time which can result in headache, dizziness, fainting, yellowing of skin, and temporary nerve/brain damage that can last 3 months to 3 years.

One case for toxicity reported 5,500mg for one dose, while another reported 500mg over a period of time (3 months or so), which happens to be the equivalent of B12 in one bottle of 5 hour energy. The recommended daily dose for B3 is 6mg, .8 for B6, and 30mg for B12. The amount of B3 in a 5 Hour Energy drink is 30mg, 40mg of B6, and 500mcg of B12. The amount of B Vitamins could potentially lead to an overdose. In the most extreme case, if taken daily and over a period of time 5 Hour Energy shots could very well cause temporary nerve/brain damage (in the most extreme cases). Symptoms such as numb hands and feet are signs of toxic levels. This is also the type of toxicity that can be expected from synthesized B vitamins.
If you are interested in a really unique, safe, and health promoting energy shot please be open to using our reliable and effective EVB Concentrate, you'll be glad you did!

and there are about 30 more...
May 02, 2012
More today on the dangers of commercailly available sports and energy drinks from Health Day. In the midst of this just remember this is the reason I created herbalYODA's sportZtea many years ago. This is an all natural and ...
Jan 17, 2012
Energy Drinks. UPDATE:15 January 2012. Once again energy drinks are in the news and it appears that it isn't good (no surprise!). Agence France-Presse reports that "Australia experts call for energy drink warnings".
Oct 13, 2009
For some time we have been writing about energy drinks, and out most recent update gives you information along with the several other articles we have posted about energy drinks here on Natural Health News. Safe Energy ...
Aug 20, 2010
Study authors Stephanie Ballard of Nova Southeastern University and colleagues Jennifer Wellborn-Kim and Kevin Clauson say energy drinks typically feature caffeine and a combination of other ingredients -- including ...

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