AddThis Feed Button "Frequently Copied, Never Duplicated"

Monday, November 30, 2009

FLU Shots and increased health risks: Lungs and Asthma Worse

> Flu shots can make lung function worse

In 1998, a study of 262 adults in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial evaluated the effect of flu shots in asthma patients. Subjects kept a record of daily respiratory symptoms, medications, doctor visits and peak expiratory flow (PEF) before and after the vaccination. PEF readings measure of how well the lungs are functioning - an increase in PEF means lung function has improved, and a decrease means that lung function has gotten worse. Of the 255 patients with paired data, approx. 7% had worse lung function after they got a flu shot. In fact, 11 saw a reduction in PEF greater than 20% and 8 had a decline of >30%.

> Flu shots don't protect children with asthma

Vaccinating asthmatic children against influenza is unlikely to protect them from attacks and may even worsen their condition. Researchers found asthma-related emergency department visits are significantly more likely among children who have received a flu shot. Two groups of 400 asthmatic children were compared. One group received the vaccine, the other did not. Those who were vaccinated were found to be almost twice as likely to seek assistance at an emergency department because of their asthma.

Getting the H1N1 shot doesn't mean you won't get sick

From Section 12.1 of the Novartis 2009 H1N1 package insert: Mechanism of Action

"...antibody titers (after) vaccination with inactivated influenza H1N1 virus vaccine have not been correlated with protection from influenza illness." In plain language, having an H1N1 antibody after getting an H1N1 shot has no correlation with not getting sick.

Health Tips

Vitamin D Level: The only way to know for sure if your levels are sufficient is a blood test. Ask your doctor to order 25-OH Vitamin D. This is important because often, physicians order 1,25-Vitamin D instead. This is an incorrect test. Your 25-OH level needs to be between 60-80ng/mL. Many reference labs report antiquated ranges.
Your level must be consistently above 50ng/mL. Below this level, your body is unable to store any of the vitamin and you are using it as quickly as you are taking it in. Adequate levels are the same for children and adults.
As we approach winter, this is the most important parameter for avoiding the flu.
Another supplement that is good for those who may not be able to take large doses of vitamin D is NAC, which stands for N-acetyl cysteine, a natural derivative of the amino acid L-cysteine and a precursor to the antioxidant glutathione. NAC is an anti-inflammatory, an immune-boosting power, and supports liver function. It will not necessarily prevent the flu, but studies show it will decrease the severity of the symptoms. is particularly helpful in thinning lung mucus. Normal doses of NAC are 1500mg per day for liver support and prevention.
ORDER SUPPLEMENTS and  25 OH test, high potency Vitamin D or NAC


claira said...

Good post.... with very informative information on health.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this informative post, I might use some content as inspiration for one of my articles :)